This is where I mention I picked Virginia to win the NCAA tournament. And it was a legit foul (we’re not gonna dwell on the double dribble).

This where I praise the Dundalk and Chesapeake softball teams, which engaged in a tight, dramatic, tense game on Monday that ended 1-0, Dundalk, and required the reversal of a call in the top of the seventh to keep the Bayhawks from tying the score.

(The reversed call was also legit. Dundalk’s first baseman did pick the ball up before the runner arrived.)

I praise those two teams because the game was tight, dramatic and tense.

Here are the scores of the other games I covered over the previous week: 15-3 (baseball), 14-4, 11-3 and 19-1 (boys lacrosse), 11-6 (softball, and not as close as the final score would indicate)) and 20-1 (girls lacrosse).

People see me with a camera at games and assume I’m a photographer. Actually, I’m a writer with a camera. Emphasis on “writer.”

And it can be tough to write a decent story about a 20-1 game. Particularly when the team you’re covering has the “1.”

It’s been a theme thus far this young spring season. Before that Dundalk-Chesapeake softball game, the closest game I attended this season was Patapsco’s 10-5 win over Chesapeake in girls lacrosse.

(That 11-6 softball game went like this: 5-0, 5-2, 6-2, 6-3, 10-3, 10-5, 11-5, 11-6. Never really in doubt after the fourth inning, whereas the 10-5 lacrosse game was 7-5 at one point).

It’s really a them in high school sports. There will always be more lopsided games than close games. The key is to chose the right games to cover.

But sometimes I have no choice. Each week in the spring, I try to cover a softball, baseball, girls lacrosse and boys lacrosse game (and track and field when there’s the opportunity).

Which is how i find myself watching Sparrows Point play Dulaney in girls lacrosse instead of Dundalk playing Lansdowne in boys lax (9-6 Owl win); I already had a boys lacrosse game for the week, and needed a girls lacrosse game, and Patapsco had shut down its athletic department for the week due to some art-related field trip.

Sparrows Point got hammered by Dulaney. It really wasn’t a boring game — just watching Dulaney play can be interesting — but there wasn’t really anything upon which to base a decent story.

For the Pointers, there’s no shame in a lopsided loss to an extremely talented team. The 20-1 final score just reflected what happens when a really good Class 1A school runs up against an elite Class 4A school (Dulaney has been to the state championship game eight times, including last season, and has won three state titles, most recently in 2016).

The Lions were fast — extremely fast. They had excellent stick skills, intercepting Sparrows Point passes when the ball was practically in the Pointers’ stick. And they scooped up ground balls on the run, not breaking stride as they sprinted up to the ball.

Dulaney is an outstanding team — and no longer a concern for Sparrows Point. The Pointers will not see Dulaney in the postseason. The focus is on beating Loch Raven, the team which knocked the then-defending regional champ Pointers out of the playoffs last season and which figures to be the biggest obstacle between Sparrows Point and the regional title this season.

Dulaney presented a similar problem for the Sparrows Point boys. The Lion boys were talented, excelled at knocking the ball out of the Pointers’ sticks while never dropping it themselves, and had absolute cannons when it came to taking shots.

No team the Pointers will face in the postseason will be anywhere close as good as Dulaney.

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